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Making Your House a Home: Tips for Hanging Pictures in Your Glendale Rental

A Couple Hanging Photos on the Wall of Their Glendale Rental HomePersonalizing your rental home can be both creative and rewarding. Be that as it may, as a renter, it is fundamental to do so with as little damage to the home’s walls as you can. Security deposit refunds often depend, largely on returning the property in the same condition it was in when you moved in. This is the reason why knowing how to hang pictures in order to minimize damage can be useful. This is especially true if your Glendale rental home has plaster walls. If you are preparing to hang artwork, photographs, or another type of wall décor in your rental home, consider making use of one or more available alternatives to minimize holes and keep your security deposit safe.

Depending on the age of your rental home, you could have either drywall or plaster walls. Despite the fact that they may have a similar appearance under a coat or two of paint, there are few noteworthy differences. Plaster walls are common in older homes due to the popularity of the method in years past. But plaster cracks and crumbles easily, especially if you are trying to hammer in a nail. Drywall, on the other hand, is, without a doubt, more common in newer homes because it is less expensive and easier to install. Drywall can hold up against some careful hammering but may also break apart under rough treatment.

With all the potential conditions that could all turn out badly, learning about the best ways to hang your wall décor is very helpful. For artwork or pictures weighing fewer than five pounds, think about trying to make use of an adhesive hook, tape, or even poster putty instead of nails. Adhesive hooks come in a few different sizes and styles and work great on both plaster and drywall. Several sorts of adhesive hooks are also removable, designed to pull free from the wall without leaving any damage behind. This is likewise correct for poster putty. More often than not, either product will help you with decorating whichever way you’d like, with as many lightweight items as you’d like, without making countless holes or causing other damage.

Hanging heavier artwork and décor can be a bit more of a challenge. Even if you can try using heavy-duty adhesive tape designed for heavy or industrial use, you may still need to make at least one hole in the wall to install a hanger capable of bearing the item’s weight. In both plaster and drywall walls, items between 5 and 10 pounds can be securely hung with a nail hammered in at an angle. For items over 10 pounds, nevertheless, it is highly advised to use a stud finder and a screw anchor to install a hook directly into a stud. Neither plaster nor drywall will bolster very heavy items unless they are screwed directly into a wooden stud.

Obviously, different approaches to using heavy décor items include placing them on furniture instead of hanging them on the wall. For example, large framed artwork could be set above the dresser or bookshelf, creating a damage-free decorative touch to any room. Console tables are another excellent choice for displaying photos and home décor.

Personalizing your space is an excellent way to feel more comfortable in your rental. But doing so in a way that ensures the return of your security deposit can seem like a challenge. Be that as it may, by knowing your options and getting inventive with your walls, you can quickly figure out how to do both.

Have questions about security deposits? Wondering how you deal with a tenant who is upset by the rules in your lease? Need some guidance in creating a solid lease in the first place? Real Property Management East San Gabriel Valley has an entire team of experts ready to help. Contact us online or call us at 626-600-2884 today.

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