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When Burbank Tenants Ring in the New Year with a Bang

Burbank Tenant’s Hosting a New Year’s Eve PartyNew Year’s Eve is a huge social event in the United States. People all across the nation have get-togethers in their homes, attend private parties, or attend public social events to say bye to the old year and embrace the new. Your Burbank tenants, too, will probably observe New Year’s Eve with a collective gathering of some style. For this reason, when it comes to your renters throwing parties in one of your rental homes, it’s pivotal to know what can be concluded to keep parties observed and how to take a forward-looking strategy, from the language in your lease documents to proper enforcement of its terms.

Keeping your tenants’ New Year’s Eve celebrations from turning out to be a large event that increases the risk of damage and liability can be an inconvenience. For example, how many people are too much when organizing an event on your property? Can (and should) you try to stop your tenants from drinking liquor? What if your tenants want to fire up fireworks or noisemakers at midnight?

These circumstances (and more) can all be dealt with in your lease documents. The wording in your lease should limit the number of visitors allowed on the property at any time with larger get-togethers requiring permission. The specific number can vary, but “no more than 10 for fewer than four hours” is a popular option.

While you can’t lawfully forbid the intake of alcohol by your renters, you can place specific language in your lease that addresses illegal activities and states the consequences of allowing such activities on your rental property in Burbank. You might also think about prohibiting large numbers of people, loud noise, or a sizable number of cars on the property. Fireworks should be prohibited at all of your rental homes, but you might evaluate composing a special note of holiday-related activities (such as thunderous music or blow-outs) that would develop a public nuisance for the entire district.

Another thing you can do is make sure that your tenants have their personal renter’s insurance in addition to renter’s legal liability. In the incident that a large party does occur on the property, the likelihood of damage and injury increases considerably. If damage or injury does exist, you could be held accountable unless your tenants have their own insurance coverage.

Finally, keeping your rental homes protected requires that you are continuously enforcing the terms of the lease agreement. If a party comes unruly, loud, destructive, or illegal activity is is taking place, it’s necessary to move rapidly and definitively to hold your renters accountable.

The best thing is that you don’t have to do all of this on your own. At Real Property Management East San Gabriel Valley, we will ensure that your lease documents include specific and binding language while monitoring activity, watching for those things that may not comply. Please contact us online or by phone at 626-600-2884 to find out more about what we can do for you.

We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the Nation. See Equal Housing Opportunity Statement for more information.